punctuation

The Punctuation Revolution

What happened to punctuation as we knew it? If you’ve been striving to use it properly in print, digital punctuationtechnology has changed the way we use it today. For example, we are more focused on word count than sentence structure. Even for the non-grammatically obsessed, deviations from the established rules of punctuation and grammar indicate a break from tradition.

With the proliferation of smartphones, tablets, texts, and social networking, we’re communicating our thoughts so much and so fast that punctuation has become less important, almost superfluous. Internet culture generally favors a lighter, more informal style of punctuation.

Technology has led us to use written language more like speech, in a real-time, back-and-forth between two or more people. For example, a line break allows people to more accurately emulate in writing the rhythm of speech.

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Parallelism Gives Your Writing a Left Edge

Originally written by Marcia Riefer Johnston, TechWhirl

Parallelism. The word itself sports a pair of rails, conjuring up images of things perfectly aligned. Rows of corn. Ribs of cornfieldcorduroy. Rings of latitude. When you write and speak, you align words. You do this naturally. You dash off to the store saying, “I’m going to get pistachios, tuna, and champagne.” You don’t think, I’m aligning a series of nouns. The nouns line themselves up. Words seek their own kind, says Sheridan Baker, “noun to noun, adjective to adjective, infinitive to infinitive” (The Practical Stylist, 1998). If only words sought their own kind with more gusto. It surprises me how often I come across near misses. For example, the author bio on the back of a book about using voicemail effectively includes this clunker:

“Sheldon has worked for corporations, associations, and in leadership roles for nonprofit organizations.”

If Sheldon [false name] had channeled his inner shopper while writing, for a split Continue reading