A Guide to Careers in Technical Writing

Technical_TypingWritten by Allan Hoffman

To some people, any job with the word “writer” in the title looks like it must be a blast — the next best thing to working on episodes of “Mad Men.” If spotting the job title Technical Writer in your job search whets your appetite to learn more, here’s a guide to the profession.

Is Technical Writing for You?

“If your goal is to write a novel, this is not the job,” says Saul Carliner, a former president of the Society for Technical Communication (STC). “Although the finished product is something you wrote, there’s a lot of collaboration. You’re interviewing people. You’re coordinating. Twenty to 30 percent of your time is writing.”

Contrary to what many assume, working as a technical writer involves much more than sitting alone at your PC. The job requires plenty of contact with technical professionals, from programmers and project managers to machine operators and medical technicians. Solitary? Not quite. Collaborative? Most definitely.

If you’re considering a job as a technical writer, one way to learn if it’s for you is to spend several hours reading and reviewing computer manuals and online help systems, like those for your operating system and assorted applications. Ask yourself a simple question, Carliner suggests: “Is writing this what I want to do for a living?” Also, remember that companies use most technical documentation for internal purposes — no one in the outside world will ever see it.

But the field has broadened to include a variety of job roles and responsibilities, as the name of its leading professional organization, the Society for Technical Communication, suggests. Technical communicators write and edit technical manuals, but their work may also include producing online tutorials, web-based training, and other materials for industries ranging from healthcare to manufacturing.

And the pay? According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median technical writer salary was $64,610 in 2011.

What Background Do You Need?

As a group, technical communicators come from varied backgrounds. According to an STC membership study, the five most common academic backgrounds are English, technical communication, science or engineering, computer science, and journalism,. Anyone with a technical background will have an easier time breaking into the industry, as it shows a facility with technical topics and the ability to work with industry professionals. Consider taking courses in the following topics to build a foundation:

  • Technical Writing: Typically offered at colleges and community colleges as a way to gain an overview of the field and develop writing samples.
  • Web Design: A way to gain an understanding of design and presentation issues.
  • Programming: To help you gain a better understanding of how software is created.

Do You Need to Know Specific Programs?

You should know Microsoft Word, if you don’t already, and you’ll be better off if you’re familiar with FrameMaker or RoboHelp, two programs often used for writing technical documentation. Knowledge of Web production tools also is an asset.

Can You Move into Other IT Jobs?

Technical communicators often move into jobs as programmers, systems analysts, information architects, and project leaders. Others shift into sales or management roles.” It’s a great way to get into an organization, and then move into a different job,” says Carliner.

Whatever your goal, the more technical know-how you acquire, the better. Throughout the information technology world, people who have superior communication skills and can hold their own with die-hard techies command a premium.

How Do You Get Experience?

Budding technical communicators should seek out internships, volunteer work, and other opportunities to gain experience and build a portfolio of work in the field. You will have a tough time finding a company willing to consider you without writing samples. Consider volunteering your services as part of an open-source project to demonstrate your ability to work on a team and translate technical matters into plain English.

Have something to add? Please share it in the comments.

 

Some Best Practices When Writing Help Documentation

writing-help-online

*Due to web issues, we lost information on who authored this piece.  If this is your work, please let us know and we will give you publishing credit.*

If you are planning to create online help documentation and want to make sure you end up with one that is truly helpful, here are three best practices you can follow to make sure it is:

  • Tailor it to users who have with varying skill sets and goals.
  • Review, test, and update it for accuracy.
  • Create context-sensitive topics.

Keep different users in mind

You can’t always predict what every user will know or want to know about any product. On one hand, if you oversimplify help steps, users might get confused. If you provide too much detail, they might get frustrated or bored.

One way to alleviate this problem is to divide help topics into several different types that target users at different skill levels by varying the kind and amount of information you provide. For example, you might have an overview topic, such as a definition of a specific system function, and then provide a link to all of the tasks related to that function within the overview. That way, users get just the specific steps they want.

The key is to allow users to navigate the help documentation to find (or avoid) as much detail as they want.

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Parallelism Gives Your Writing a Left Edge

Originally written by Marcia Riefer Johnston, TechWhirl

Parallelism. The word itself sports a pair of rails, conjuring up images of things perfectly aligned. Rows of corn. Ribs of cornfieldcorduroy. Rings of latitude. When you write and speak, you align words. You do this naturally. You dash off to the store saying, “I’m going to get pistachios, tuna, and champagne.” You don’t think, I’m aligning a series of nouns. The nouns line themselves up. Words seek their own kind, says Sheridan Baker, “noun to noun, adjective to adjective, infinitive to infinitive” (The Practical Stylist, 1998). If only words sought their own kind with more gusto. It surprises me how often I come across near misses. For example, the author bio on the back of a book about using voicemail effectively includes this clunker:

“Sheldon has worked for corporations, associations, and in leadership roles for nonprofit organizations.”

If Sheldon [false name] had channeled his inner shopper while writing, for a split Continue reading